Tennessee Town Stands Up to the Atheists

Chances are you’ve never even heard of Whiteville, Tennessee.  As of the 2000 Census the town, in the west side of the state in rural Hardeman County,  had a population of only 3,148, living in an area of 2.4 square miles.  The median income for a family was only $28,603. 

But what Whitehall does have is faith.  That’s why, several years ago, the residents of the town raised funds to erect a large cross atop the town’s water tower. 

But along came the Freedom From Religion Foundation—which filed a lawsuit.  At first, the group’s founder Dan Barker filed the case on behalf of “a Whiteville resident and orlistat india taxpayer.” 

The town sought counsel from the Alliance Defense Fund; but faced with the prospect of an expensive legal process, Mayor Bellar had one arm of the cross removed.  Technically, without one of its arms, the cross is no longer a religious symbol.  What it is, though, is a symbol of the city’s proud defiance against atheist activists who drive up and down the freeway, looking for religious symbols that may be on public land.

Mayor Bellar wrote a letter to Nashville lawyer Alvin Harris, who represented the Freedom From Religion Foundation.  “This brings to a close a sad chapter in the history of Whiteville,” wrote Mayor Bellar, “that can best be described as terroristic, cowardly and shameful!  The fear and terror caused our older people here is shameful.  So shame on your client and your firm!”

But the story doesn’t end there.  As the cross’s

arm came down, the people of Whiteville began to express their faith and their solidarity.  People began to make crosses and stick them in their yards, on the sides of buildings, wherever they could.  Citizens placed two crosses on the right of way in front of City Hall.  The Mayor himself put up a cross in front of his business. 

The Freedom From Religion Foundation is still sputtering, and has filed suit again.  The new lawsuit stops short of claiming that one of the city’s own had complained; instead, the legal verbiage was changed to “John Doe who occasionally comes to Whiteville to transact business.”  In short, says Mayor James Bellar, there is one atheist out there somewhere, who is seeking to deprive the town’s Christian majority of their free speech rights. 

This time, Mayor Bellar asserts, the town stands ready to defend itself.  Bring it on!


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6 Responses to “Tennessee Town Stands Up to the Atheists”

  1. Good. Nearly 90 percent of the people of these United States identify themselves as Christian. Caving in to people who don’t even have legal standing as interested parties is another of those things of which I am thoroughly tired. Good for Whiteville.

  2. Over the years there have been many such events. These attacks can only be combated and overcome with unity..Not only the Catholics but with all Christian. On the local levels unified through the priests and ministers,to all the Bishops, to all National levels and even to the Papacy and Orthodxies . The initial costs for attorneys may be expensive but if this cost is shared INTERNATIONALLY it could be overcome. UNITY IN THE FACE OF THESE FOOLS IS THE O N L Y WAY to overcome their attacks of Secular Socialistic Inequity that have increased with the support of misguided politicians in the USA and worldwide…The thing is NOT TO GIVE IN to their demands but to defend and overcome.
    ONE of the most important things one learns growing up in mid-city is that everyone most make a choice to be either PREDATOR or PREY…..

    • Majito says:

      Why are atheists on here“because its not a reoigilus chat roombut a question answers site about religion and spiritualityand atheists actually can talk, discuss, debate, give and receive knowledge on god and religion and spiritualitythats whyand same as you, they like to share knowledge with others and hear knowledge from othersand even help some people by answering their qs and giving adviceit says on the site “Yahoo answersAsk answer discover”……….’ not reoigilus chat for reoigilus people’”people answering questions are not preachingit is a q/a site after allthis place is about knowledge and information, not beliefs and agreementyou dont have to agree with everyone to have an interest in a subjectyou dont have to believe every word about it to have an interest in itnot everyone who is interested in music is a musiciannot everyone who is interested in cooking is a chefnot everyone who is interested in archaeology is an archaeologistyou see what i mean .not everyone who is interested in religion is reoigilus not everyone who is interested in spirituality is spiritual”i chose to come to r&s, as that seems to be your main point, because i love to ask and answer qs on religion and spirituality, i love talking, debating on ALL subjects of interest and especially ones that get people really thinking and talkingasi love sociology and psychology and this place is great for thatand atheists can be spiritual, i believe many other things just not god”References :

  3. Sorry to do this in this manner but in my previous post I forgot to mention that soon after this occurred the same atheist group attacked a town in Texas with a demand to remove the Nativity scene had been placed on the lawn in front of the City hall i believe.
    Wel the unity of the people and the mayor gathered several thousand people on the scene and with the State Atty General told tthe atheists That “they would take it down “WHEN HELL FREEZES OVER” as well as “DON”T MESS WITH TEXAS”….and that was the end of that…… THAT”S WHAT IT TAKES………

  4. Good Without God says:

    I’m glad someone is finally speaking out on behalf of the atheists in these communities. It’s social suicide to act on your own, because Christians usually shun and hate you after they find out you don’t share their faith. It’s sad. I hope freedom from religion keeps it up!

    • Kathy Schiffer says:

      Dear Good Without God: I’m sorry if you’ve had a bad experience with a Christian. Can’t say I’ve ever met one who “hates” nonbelievers, and I’m guessing you’re projecting a bit. Now can we talk about the legal issues here?

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